Bear’s Book Haul: October 22, 2018

Bear's book haulHere is a hella late book haul…!  Sorry, OctPoWriMo, Preptober, Inktober, and general life/work/parenthood is kicking my butt.

We had our normal library day on Wednesday – though it was shorter than usual, it was also something I want to write more about later – and got a small stack of books this time around.  We also finally worked through the stack from our library sale book haul, and while there were no major stand outs, I think Nathan really enjoyed the Arthur books. My son thinks D.W. is hilarious, which makes sense, since she’s a pretty sassy four year old with an extremely limited palate, and he’s a pretty sassy (almost) four year old with an extremely limited palate (though I will say Bear is far less bratty than D.W. about 95% of the time).  He also currently absolutely fascinated with the idea of going to school, so he especially liked Arthur’s Teacher Moves In (which I also really love.  I have a weird affection for Mr. Ratburn.  I… don’t want to get into it).

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Given that we’ve had this stack of books for almost a week now, I can name a pretty clear winner for this haul already, but I’ll be fair and hold off just in case something dramatic changes in the next two days.  Anyway, this was our haul:

Fairy Floss: The Sweet Story of Cotton Candy, by Ann Ingalls:  “In this book, a young girl named Lily and her Aunt Mae are told all about Fairy Floss by John Wharton, one of the inventors. Lily can’t wait to go to the Fair and see how it’s made. While there, she even makes a batch for herself!”

No Biggy!, by Elycia Rubin:  “Getting frustrated is a part of life! And whether the curious little girl in this story is working on a puzzle, getting the zipper to slide all the way up her jacket or trying to spread peanut butter on a piece of toast, she learns to manage frustration by taking a deep breath, saying No Biggy! and trying again. She even teaches her mommy and daddy a thing or two!”

Dragons Love Tacos 2: The Sequel, by Adam Rubin: “News alert! It has just been discovered that there are NO MORE TACOS left anywhere in the world. This is a huge problem because, as you know, dragons love tacos. If only there was a way for the dragons to travel back in time, to before tacos went extinct. Then they could grab lots of tacos and bring them back! It’s the perfect plan, as long as there’s no spicy salsa. You remember what happened last time…”

Construction Zone, by Cheryl Willis Hudson:  “Caution! Construction zone ahead! Anyone who has ever stopped to watch a big building going up — and who hasn’t? — will be thrilled by this behind-the-scenes look at an amazing construction project.”

The Deep Deep Puddle, by Mary Jessie Parker:  “Young puddle jumpers will delight in this silly Seuss-like fantasy about a puddle that keeps on growing. How deep can it get? So deep that soon enough, glub glub glub, the entire city sinks out of sight, only to reappear later with everything in disarray.”

That’s it for this week… uh, until Wednesday.  So, yeah.  That’s it for… the next day or so.  Wow, I need to be more on top of my posting schedule.  OctPoWriMo really has been throwing me off even more than usual.

Any recs for young readers?  I’m always open to suggestions.  Until next time!

 

 

Bear’s Book Haul: Fall Book Sales!

Bear's book haulI feel like it’s been forever since I’ve done a book haul post, but over the last two weeks or so a bunch of local libraries have been having their fall book sales.  While I didn’t get a lot of stuff for myself (except The Anxiety and Phobia Workbook for $2.00, what what), Bear made out like a bandit.  I adore library book sales; books are wonderful, but so damn expensive, and while I adore going to the library, I wish it was more affordable to curate a home library.  At $1 for hardcovers and $.50 for paperbacks, scouting out library sales is something I highly, highly recommend to anyone, but especially if you have young kids (some of Bear’s hardcover books are lovely, but they have like, 400 words, and cost $14.50.  It’s not that I don’t support children’s authors, I just literally can’t afford to buy more than a couple of books at that price.)

It’s going to take a while to work through all the books we got, but I’ll probably drop a note in our regular book hauls about how we’re faring with the book sale books, and which ones have most caught Bear’s fancy (just like we do with the weekly haul posts).

What I thought was the coolest was that there were a few things I found that I remembered fondly from my own childhood, and it’s weird how powerfully nostalgic I felt when I found them, even though I honest to God hadn’t even remembered they’d existed before I saw them on the library table.

Anyway, our haul:

Arthur’s Chicken Pox, by Marc Brown
Arthur’s Valentine, by Marc Brown
Arthur’s Pet Business, by Marc Brown
Arthur’s Teacher Moves In, by Marc Brown
The Goodnight Gecko, by Gil McBarnet
Rainbow Rhino, by Peter Sis
When I’m as Big as Freddie, by Jocelyn Stevenson
Spring Cleaning, by Pat Tornborg
What Do You Do?, by Kingsley Emily
If I Lived Alone, by Michaela Muntean
Amelia Bedelia and the Surprise Shower, by Peggy Parish
Amelia Bedelia Goes Camping, by Peggy Parrish
Oh, the Places You’ll Go!, by Dr. Seuss
Curious George Visits the Zoo, by Margaret Rey
Curious George and the Pizza, by Margaret Rey
Curious George Rides a Bike, by H.A. Rey
Where the Wild Things Are, by Maurice Sendak
Sunny Bunny Comes Home, by… Lynx Books? (It was part of the Raggedy Ann Grow-and-Learn Library; maybe it was a collaborative effort?)

Sunny Bunny was the one books I remembered by name having owned – and read, and re-read – as a kid, though several of the Sesame Street ones looked super familiar as well.  And, I just need to note, I’m astounded by how well-kept  these books are. The publication date for the editions of the Sesame Street books we bought was 1980.  I mean.  Those books are older than I am, and in far, far better shape quite frankly.

Anyway, as usual, please let me know if there are any books you’d recommend Bear check out, and I’ll let you know how he enjoyed the haul!

 

 

Bear’s Weekly Book Haul: August 24th, 2018

Bear's book haulWell, here we are, end of summer.  I start back up at work on Monday (more on that later, I’m sure), and after Labor Day, out library resumes it’s regular hours.  We’ll probably retain our Wednesday schedule when it comes to taking out books, but with the library resuming it’s weekend hours, that opens up the possibility of being able to take Bear to other programming – our library has some nice story time, read-aloud, and craft programming for younger kids, so that’ll be nice.

Ugh. there’s a lot of things I’m looking forward to about fall.  But that’s literally another blog post.

Anyway, last week’s clear winner was undeniably Poor Louie, by Tony Fucile.

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Tony Fucile has spent a great deal of his professional career in animation, including work on The Iron Giant and The Incredibles, which I think is really obvious in the style of this book (more Iron Giant than Incredibles, honestly).  The drawings were adorable, and it was a sweet take on a story trope that’s been done before (big sibling – fur sibling, in this case – feels displaced and lonely with the impending birth of the younger sibling).  Bear is very, very firmly an only child, but I bet this would be a nice book to read to older-siblings-to-be.  Bear really enjoyed how evocative and emotive Louie was, and loved giggling at his faces while he walked in the rain as was “tortured” by babies.  And, of course, he loved yelling “POOR LOUIE!” every couple of pages.

This week’s batch was chosen by Bear’s dad.

Morris Mole, by Dan Yaccarino:  “Meet Morris Mole—he has always been a little bit different. When the moles are running low on food, it’s up to clever Morris to save the day. With a little help from an unexpected friend and a lot of digging, Morris learns that even the smallest creatures can do big things.”

Come to the Fairies Ball, by Jane Yolen:  “All the fairies are excited to be invited to the King’s ball, except for one young fairy whose only party dress is in tatters, but some wise words from the resident ants help her be all she can be.”

Any Questions?, by Marie-Louise Gay:  “Many children want to know where stories come from and how a book is made. Marie-Louise Gay’s new picture book provides them with some delightfully inspiring answers through a fictional encounter between an author and some very curious children — together they collaborate on writing and illustrating a story.”

The Only Child, by Guojing:  “A little girl—lost and alone—follows a mysterious stag deep into the woods, and, like Alice down the rabbit hole, she finds herself in a strange and wondrous world. But… home and family are very far away. How will she get back there?”

Drawn Together, by Mihn Le:  “When a young boy visits his grandfather, their lack of a common language leads to confusion, frustration, and silence. But as they sit down to draw together, something magical happens-with a shared love of art and storytelling, the two form a bond that goes beyond words.”

That’s all for this week.  As always, if you have an recomendations for books for us to read together – or emerging reader books that Bear can start looking at on his own – leave it down in the comments!

Bear’s Weekly Book Haul: August 16th, 2018

Bear's book haulUgh, I feel like it’s been forever.  Vacation messed up a lot of things – it completed destroyed my not-yet-routine routine, and I honestly feel like I’m starting from scratch all over again this week (chores seem to actually be more on track than they were before vacay, but the personal morning/evening routine, plus my eating/exercise has been shot straight back to hell).

Anyway, it had been almost a month since wed hit the library, and we finally went yesterday,  It was my turn to pick Bear’s books (Bear is invited to help, but is often already too engrossed in the libraries toys and puzzles), and I’m really happy/excited with this week’s haul.

The Miss Nelson Collection, by Harry Allard
From GoodreadsMore than forty years ago Viola Swamp slinked into Room 207 at Horace B. Smedley School and whipped Miss Nelson’s terrible, rude, worst-class-in-the-whole-school students into shape. In the intervening generations since the publication of Miss Nelson Is Missing!, millions of children have been fascinated by the legend of Miss Swamp. A diabolical creation from the minds of Harry G. Allard and James Marshall, Miss Nelson’s alter ego illuminates the folly of misbehavior through amazing feats of disguise. And she’s never been more hilarious than now!

Poor Louie, by Tonny Fucile
From Goodreads Louie’s life is great! A walk on the leash every morning, ice cream on Sundays, snuggling in bed at night with Mom and Dad. Even the playdates with Mom’s friends despite their little crawling creatures who pull Louie’s ears aren’t all that bad. But then things get weird: cold food on the floor, no room in the bed, and lots of new stuff coming into the house in pairs: two small beds, two little sweaters, two seats in the stroller. Does that bode double trouble ahead, or could there be a happier surprise in store for Louie?

A House That Once Was, by Julie Fogliano
From Goodreads:  “Deep in the woods / is a house / just a house / that once was
/ but now isn’t / a home.”  Who lived in that house? Who walked down its hallways? Why did they leave it, and where did they go?  Two children set off to find the answers, piecing together clues found, books left behind, forgotten photos, discarded toys, and creating their own vision of those who came before.

The Most Magnificent Thing, by Ashley Spires
From Goodreads:  Ashley Spires has created a charming picture book about an unnamed girl and her very best friend, who happens to be a dog. The girl has a wonderful idea. She is going to make the most MAGNIFICENT thing! She knows just how it will look. She knows just how it will work. All she has to do is make it, and she makes things all the time. Easy-peasy!?

Sea Turtle, by Camilla De la Bédoyère
(I cannot find a Goodreads page!  Maybe I’m overlooking something).  This is a non-fiction book all about – you guessed it – sea turtles.  Post-Florida, Bear told us his favorite animals that he saw were the turtles.  So, I thought it might be nice for him to read a book about them.

That’s it for this week’s haul.  As always, if you have any book recs for ages 3 – 5, please drop a line in the comments!

Bear’s Weekly Book Haul: July 19th, 2018

Bear's book haulWe had several set backs involving Bear’s book-borrowing, the first of which is, the library we use asked us for updated information and we had to give them our current address – which is no longer in the same city as said library (we’ve moved to a neighboring city since the card was issued).  That’s not a big deal – we’re part of a consortium, and can borrow from any of the participating libraries on any card – but we do have to have a card issued by our hometown library.

This happened last Wednesday while we were choosing Bear’s books, and we were not allowed to check them out until we got our new card.  The librarian said she would hold the books for us until then.  It took Andy until this Wednesday before he had the time to get to the library and make the change, and by the time he made it to pick up the books, they had just (within the preceding half-hour, according to the librarian) released them.  Ugh.

No great tragedy though, since this allowed Andy to pick out some new books, a few of which were chosen specifically in anticipation of our Florida trip in less than two weeks.  Bear’s been on a plane before but he was 8 months old, and slept/nursed through most of it, so this will be the first flight he (may) be able to really remember.

Anyway, on to the haul!

Oh!  Before I forget: highlight of last haul was unequivocally Crunch, the Shy Dinosaur.  It was yet another participatory book, where the reader interacts with Crunch, and my son – who loves chatting people up, making noise, and dinosaurs – adored it.  He even brought it to bed with him and “read” it to himself more than once.

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Ok, now, this week for real!

Harriet Gets Carried Away, by Jessie Sima
GoodReads:  Harriet loves costumes. She wears them to the dentist, to the supermarket, and most importantly, to her super-special dress-up birthday party. Her dads have decorated everything for the party and Harriet has her most favorite costume all picked out for the big day. There’s just one thing missing—party hats!  But when Harriet dons her special penguin errand-running costume and sets out to find the perfect ones, she finds something else instead—real penguins! Harriet gets carried awaywith the flock. She may look like a penguin, but she’s not so sure she belongs in the arctic. Can Harriet manage her way back to her dads (and the party hats!) in time for her special day?

Prickly Hedgehogs! by Jane McGuinness
GoodReads:  When the sun has set, Hedgehog’s day has only just begun. She’s out and about, snuffling through layers of leaves and twigs as she searches for bugs and other things to eat. Young animal lovers will enjoy following Hedgehog and her little hoglets through towns and gardens, parks and woodland, as they sniff-sniff-sniff for food.

Dinosoaring, by Deb Lund
GoodReads:
  But to get airborne, they need a plan. They dinoblow. They run, push, leap, flap-and take flight! The sky becomes their stage, as they join an air show. Zipping and zooming and dancing on wings, the dinos are soon upside down and dinosick! They decide to bail, hoping their dinochutes will work. They dino-do!

Planes Fly!, by George Ella Lyon
GoodReads:  Take to the skies with this fun, rhyming book about all that planes do! From jet planes to puddle jumpers, from the cockpit to the rudders, this book explores it all—and the bright, dynamic illustrations will keep even the youngest of readers engaged.

My First Airplane Ride, by Patricia Hubbell
GoodReads:  A first airplane ride can be very exciting! Watching planes take off and land, going through security, walking the jet way, finding the right seat, watching out the window as the plane taxis down the runway, and flying up high in the sky and then, at the other end, Grandma waiting with a hug!

The Town of Turtles, by Michelle Cuevas
GoodReads:  When a solitary turtle decides to make some renovations to his shell, he doesn’t have a blueprint, only a dream for a better life. He starts by building a deck—though he figures the deck could use a fireplace. And a fireplace needs wood, so naturally, he plants a garden. But it isn’t really a garden without a pond . . . Soon, Turtle can barely recognize his own shadow.  Finally satisfied with the intricate world upon his back, word begins to spread of the magical “Town of Turtle,” attracting newcomers from far and wide. All are welcome in Turtle’s town, where life is a little less lonely, if only you come out of your shell.

Bear’s Weekly Book Haul: June 29, 2018

Bear's book haulLast Wednesday was my crazy summer prep day, so we wound up not going to the library – Bear got an extra week with his books, and we did a few re-reads.  This week, I think the winner for us was There’s a Monster in Your Book!

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It’s an interactive book that tells you do do things on each page to try to get the monster out of your books – shake the book, tip the pages, yell really loud – and it was a really fun experience, watching how into it Bear got, even on the third read-through.  It’s not hugely text dense, and it doesn’t really have a storyline, but it’s a great little book to end the night with, spending some time and having a few giggles with the kiddo.

For me, the clear winner was A Family is a Family is a Family, which was short and sweet, with really lovely illustrations, about the different configurations that a family can take.  It brought up families with LGBT parents, interracial families, single moms, foster parents, adoptive parents, kids being raised by grandparents, only children, and large families. It was nice to see the diversity of family celebrated, with the singular through line of love and support being families’ defining feature.51FYQ-KDJKL._SX258_BO1,204,203,200_

This week’s haul, you’ll notice several Olivia books – what can I say, our family loves Olivia!  These books are part of the Nickelodeon tie-in series, based on the animated series.  They’re good, solid little storybooks, but the original series by Ian Falconer simply cannot be beat.  If you haven’t read Falconer’s books, please do yourself and your child a favor.  Our favorite is probable Olivia Goes to Venice.

Anyway…:

Olivia Plants a Garden, by Emily Sollinger
GoodRead summary:  Olivia is planting a garden and she can’t wait to see what blooms from her mystery seeds. She knows she’ll have the best plant in the entire class.

Olivia Trains Her Cat, by Sarah Alby and Joe Purdy
GoodReads summary:  Olivia wants her cat to be just as amazing as Francine’s, who can perform incredible tricks on demand. But teaching a cat to perform isn’t as easy as it looks, as Olivia soon finds out! Kids will love this charming ready-to-read story with rebus icons about Olivia and her pet.

Dinner with Olivia, by Emily Sollinger
GoodReads summary:  Olivia is thrilled to be invited to Francine’s house for dinner…she just knows it’s going to be a very sophisticated evening. And then it’s time for Olivia to have Francine over…but what will Francine think of her family’s casual table manners?


Olivia Cooks Up a Surprise, by Emily Sollinger and Jared Osterhold
GoodReads summary: It’s Mother’s birthday, and Olivia is planning something super special–a surprise dinner! What’s on the menu? All red food, of course!

Crunch the Shy Dinosaur, by  Cirocco Dunlap and Greg Pizzoli
GoodReads summary:  Crunch is a lovely and quiet brontosaurus who has hidden himself in some shrubbery and is rather shy. He would like to play, but it will require some gentle coaxing from you! If you are patient and encouraging, you will find yourself with a new friend!

Road Work Ahead, by Anastasia Suen and Jannie Ho
GoodReads summary:  When a family sets out on a trip to Grandma’s, their journey proves to be more like a visit to a construction site. Sidewalks are being poured, streetlights repaired, roads resurfaced. The noise of jackhammers, whistles, and horns fills the air.

Three Bears in a Boat, by David Soman
GoodReads summary:  Three bear siblings break their mother’s favorite blue seashell, and rather than tell her, they decide to set out in their sailboat to find her a new one. On their quest they encounter salty sailors, strange new islands, huge whales, and vast seas but no blue seashells. When a treacherous storm suddenly blows in, the three bears find themselves tossed about in their little boat, far from Mama. What will become of their search, and what will it take to bring them safely home?

The Curious Garden, by Peter Brown
GoodReads summary:  While out exploring one day, a little boy named Liam discovers a struggling garden and decides to take care of it. As time passes, the garden spreads throughout the dark, gray city, transforming it into a lush, green world.

That’s it for this week! (And I changed the format a little; I’m still trying to gain my footing doing this blog thing.  Is it better?  Do you like it?)  If you have any thoughts of the books we hauled this week, or any recommendations, please let us know!  We’re always looking for good books for Bear!

Bear’s Weekly Book Haul: June 7th 2018

Bear's book haul

My family and I are big readers, or at least my husband is; I love books, and words, and stories, but between my schedule and my neurodivergence, I don’t often have the time or attention left to devote to it.  But reading was my first great love, and despite being a little touch-and-go, it’s a habit I try to keep up with.

My husband, enviably, reads voraciously, his schedule and attention-span infinitely more attuned to it – but both of us, despite the differences in our current relationship to reading, are eager to instill a love of it in our son.

We are big supporters of our local library, and libraries in general, and make it a point to take Bear every week.  It’s a great way to give him the chance to socialize with other kids in a safe environment, and involve him in selecting that week’s reading material.

I thought it might be fun to post our weekly book hauls here, tell you what books we picked out that week, and what books from the previous week were a success at home, either with Bear, or with Andy and I (or both; there are a few special authors who manage to tickle both the kiddo and the two of us – but that’s another post).

Our library day during the summer is Wednesday, so Thursdays will be haul days. Anyway, on with the haul!

  • Star Climbing, by Lou Fancher [GoodReads | Amazon
    GoodReads summary:  “Welcome to the magical night world of star climbing. Run and dance with Leo the Lion and Ursa the Bear. Dive into a shimmering star pool with Pisces the Fish, and rest on the glimmering back of Cygnus the Swan. Lou Fancher lets imagination soar during this fantastical journey through sparkling star constellations. Steve Johnson and Lou Fancher’s breathtaking art brings the star animals to life, filled with radiance and glory.”
     
  • Naked, by Michael Ian Black and Debbie Ridpath Ohi [GoodReads | Amazon]
    GoodReads summary:  “Michael Ian Black and Debbie Ridpath Ohi … have paired up again to showcase the antics of an adorable little boy who just doesn’t want to get dressed.  After his bath, the little boy begins his hilarious dash around the house – in the buff! Being naked is great. Running around, sliding down the stairs, eating cookies. Nothing could be better. Unless he had a cape…”
  • Captain Cat, by Inga Moore [GoodReads | Amazon]
    GoodReads summary:  “Captain Cat loves cats. In fact, he has more cats on his ship than he has sailors. On one voyage, he discovers a remote and lonely island where the little-girl Queen has never even seen a cat. When Captain Cat’s furry companions trounce the rats infesting the island, the Queen begs Captain Cat to trade her the cats for untold treasure. Does he? Could he? What happens next? Never fear, fellow travelers! The purr-fect solution is on the horizon — and is sure to satisfy both pet-lovers and adventurers.”
  • We Found a Hat, by John Klassen [GoodReads | Amazon]
    GoodReads summary:  “Two turtles have found a hat. The hat looks good on both of them. But there are two turtles. And there is only one hat. . . . Evoking hilarity and sympathy, the shifting eyes tell the tale in this brilliantly paced story in three parts, highlighting Jon Klassen’s visual comedy and deceptive simplicity. The delicious buildup takes an unexpected turn that is sure to please loyal fans and newcomers alike.”
  • Smokey, by Bill Peet [GoodReads | Amazon]
    GoodReads summary:  “Progress forces Smokey the switch engine out of a job until he discovers a new way to help people.”

That’s it for this week.  We’ll let you know which of them were hits with the family!


¹ (I just want to note here, I include Amazon links because I feel like Amazon and GoodReads together offer a good variety of reviews. As of this writing, my blog is not monetized in any way and I recieve no money for any purchases made through this post).